A Human Year is Seven Earth Years

Adrian Randall

1:19:00 min

2020

English

Not Specified

16:9



🔴  e n t e r   p s y n e m a

KWALHIA SELECTION : A SIRIUS TRANS/MISSIONS


During the course of the 20th century, the so-called "Military Industrial Complex" in the United States was developed not only arms manufacturing, but even more foundationally through radio and television technologies. 'A Human Year is Seven Earth Years' is an experimental documentary that examines the effects of these last 100 years of telecommunications on the human psyche, weaving historical narratives and personal anecdotes across radio waves and brain waves. 
The film interrogates the psychogeographic weight of 'el imperio estadounidense' and its quest to create a militarized global communications system. To what extent has the last century of network-building been a type of psychological warfare reaching our very dreams? And what remnants of this imperial project can we use to build a different future?
Part history of empire, part personal travelogue, and part metaphysical exploration of technology, "A Human Year is Seven Earth Years" traces the story of electronic communications just as much as it questions the video essay genre itself.

The film interrogates the psychogeographic weight of el imperio estadounidense and its quest to create a militarized global communications system. To what extent has the last century of network-building been a type of psychological warfare reaching our very dreams? What remnants of this imperial project can we use to build a different future?

Part history of empire, part personal travelogue, and part metaphysical exploration of technology, "A Human Year is Seven Earth Years" traces the story of electronic communications just as much as it questions the video essay genre itself. 


This film is a reflection on the militarized development of telecommunications in the United States. I wanted to approach this obscured history from a tripartite perspective: (1) through a documentary approach of visiting and filming specific locations where major developments of United States telecom occurred that have almost entirely been lost to time; (2) through my own exploration of alternative and experimental forms of video synthesis, which historically have been made with the idea of counteracting normative forms of telecommunication broadcast; (3) and through examining my own relationship with video signals and broadcast, and seeing how aesthetic forms such as video feedback, analog degradation, and the personal archive can describe our own psychological and life journeys.
Through these disparate approaches, I seek to find describe the techno-aesthetic arch between the smallest valences of our lives to the vast, macro-planetary reaches of human architecture.



aq.randall@gmail.com

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